Double Decanted

Archives: September 2014

Cotes de Provence Sainte Victoire

100 Shades of Rosé

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This article originally appeared in the September 2014 issue of Royal Oaks Living and it is reprinted here with permission.

What was the last rosé wine you tried? Was it Lancers, the wine sold in a stone crock from Portugal? Or maybe America’s own Sutter Home white zinfandel, the popular sweet, pink wine from the 80s? If it was either one of these, I have news for you: rosé wines have changed. And if you’re not drinking rosé, you are missing out.

A Rosé in the Making

The grape varieties commonly used to make dry rosés include: Grenache, Syrah, Mourvèdre, Carignan, Cinsault, Sangiovese, Cabernet and Pinot Noir. Most rosés are a blend of two or three of these grape varieties. Although, in New World wine regions, like the U.S., rosés made exclusively from singe grape varieties are also common.

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View of the vineyards in the Marlborough district of New Zealand's South Island

The Versatility of New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc

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This article originally appeared in the August 2014 issue of Royal Oaks Living and it is reprinted here with permission.

Sauvignon Blanc is an aromatic, versatile white grape that’s grown around the world.

It’s famous in France for its use in the mineral rich wines of Sancerre and Pouilly-Fumé, as well as white Bordeaux in which it’s often blended with Semillon. New world wine regions have embraced the varietal, too. In California, it’s made into a range of wines and often labeled Fume Blanc to signify the presence of oak. It is also popular in South Africa and Chile. However, for many sommeliers and wine drinkers, the best expression of Sauvignon Blanc comes from New Zealand.

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Chateau de Beaucastel

Châteauneuf-du-Pape: The Pope’s Wine

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This article originally appeared in the June 2014 issue of Royal Oaks Living and it is reprinted here with permission.

Châteauneuf-du-Pape is one of the most famous French wines in the world. And its notoriety and allure stems from its strong ties to the Catholic Church during a time when the Papacy was located in France, not Rome.

Wine & the Avignon Papacy

In 1308, Bertrand de Got, a French bishop, was elected Pope Clement V. Concerned about security in Rome, Pope Clement V moved the papacy to Avignon, a city in France’s Rhone Valley. For the next 70 years, seven popes governed the church from Avignon. The Avignon popes were great supporters of the local wine, known as “Vin du Pape”. Pope John XII even built a summer residence just north of Avignon. This castle, called Châteauneuf-du-Pape, was a symbol of the appellation and, over time, the nearby village and the wine produced there became known by the same name.

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