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Rosé

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100 Shades of Rosé

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This article originally appeared in the September 2014 issue of Royal Oaks Living and it is reprinted here with permission.

What was the last rosé wine you tried? Was it Lancers, the wine sold in a stone crock from Portugal? Or maybe America’s own Sutter Home white zinfandel, the popular sweet, pink wine from the 80s? If it was either one of these, I have news for you: rosé wines have changed. And if you’re not drinking rosé, you are missing out.

A Rosé in the Making

The grape varieties commonly used to make dry rosés include: Grenache, Syrah, Mourvèdre, Carignan, Cinsault, Sangiovese, Cabernet and Pinot Noir. Most rosés are a blend of two or three of these grape varieties. Although, in New World wine regions, like the U.S., rosés made exclusively from singe grape varieties are also common.

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